See Summaries and Links to Top 5 Privacy Stories in February 2019

 
 

#5 — The privacy battle brewing over home security cameras

We’re on a slippery slope. You’ve got a legal right to film in public places, including your entryway. There’s little agreement whether private cameras slash crime rates, yet police are setting up voluntary registries for private cameras in dozens of communities. Cities such as Washington have begun paying up to $500 for cameras on private property. Detroit is going further: Its mayor wants to mandate security cameras at businesses open late, with a live feed going straight to police.

#4 Washington State Considers Comprehensive Data Privacy Act to Protect Personal Information

Under the proposed legislation, Washington residents will gain comprehensive rights in their personal data. Residents will have the right, subject to certain exceptions, to request that data errors be corrected, to withdraw consent to continued processing and to deletion of their data. Residents may require an organization to confirm whether it is processing their personal information and to receive a copy of their personal data in electronic form.

#3 How your health information is sold and turned into ‘risk scores’

Companies are starting to sell “risk scores” to doctors, insurers and hospitals to identify patients at risk of opioid addiction or overdose, without patient consent and with little regulation of the kinds of personal information used to create the scores.

While the data collection is aimed at helping doctors make more informed decisions on prescribing opioids, it could also lead to blacklisting of some patients and keep them from getting the drugs they need, according to patient advocates.

#2 California Data Privacy Proposal May Give Law Tough New Teeth

The strongest data privacy law in the country may be about to get sharper teeth, and lobbyists representing the tech industry think it’s a disastrous idea.

Companies that amass user data could be the target of mass class-action litigation from California consumers if they’re accused of violating the California Consumer Privacy Act, under a proposed amendment to the law filed Feb. 22, 2019.

#1 A multibillion-dollar fine against Facebook would be the largest ever imposed by the FTC

Facebook and the Federal Trade Commission are negotiating a multibillion-dollar fine to settle an investigation into the social network's privacy practices, The Washington Post reported Thursday (February 14,2019). 

It'd be the largest fine ever imposed by the agency, according to the Post, though the exact amount hasn't yet been determined. Facebook was initially concerned with the FTC's demands, a person familiar with the matter told the publication. If the two parties don't come to an agreement, the FTC could reportedly take legal action.